Herbert Marcuse
Herbert Marcuse
Publications

Marcuse's Publications


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Major Works

Reason and Revolution Eros and Civilization One-Dimensional Man An Essay on Liberation Counterrevolution and Revolt

Complete List

1922
Der deutsche Künstlerroman

Der deutsche Künstlerroman

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1925
Schiller-bibliographie

Schiller-bibliographie: unter benutzung der Trömelschen Schiller-bibliothek (1865). Berlin: S.M. Fraenkel, 1925

Reprinted in 1971

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1941
Reason and Revolution

Reason and Revolution: An Introduction to the Dialectical Thinking of Hegel and Marx first major work in English, focus on critical reason and dialectical thinking

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2 reviews

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Translations: العربية Deutsch Ελληνικά Ελληνικά español فارسی français hrvatski italiano polski português русский

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1955
Eros and Civilization

One of Herbert's best known early works: Its title alludes to Freud's Civilization and its Discontents. Marcuse's vision of a non-repressive society, based on Marx and Freud, anticipated the values of 1960s countercultural movements.

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5 reviews

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Translations: Deutsch Indonesia italiano polski português Türkçe

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1963
Notes on Philosophy

The following short article was originally published in the Brandeis University Yearbook for 1963. Marcuse taught at Brandeis as Professor of Politics and Philosophy from 1958 to 1965.

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1964
On Science and Phenomenology

"On Science and Phenomenology," in Boston Colloquium for the Philosophy of Science (1962-1964): Proceedings, edited by Robert S. Cohen and Marx W. Wartofsky, Boston Studies in the Philosophy of Science, volume 2 (New York: Humanities Press, 1965), pp. 279-290 [with comment by Aron Gurwitsch, 291-305].

    Abstract:
    The Crisis of European Science and Transcendental Phenomenology is Husserl’s last work. Written in the thirties, the first part was published in 1936, the second part only after Husserl’s death.

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1964
World without a Logos

Herbert Marcuse, "World Without a Logos", in: Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, 20:1 (1964), 25-26

When the new scientific method destroyed the idea of a universe arranged in relation to an ultimate end, it invalidated at the same time a hierarchical social system in which the pursuits and aspirations of the individual were predetermined by final causes. The new science, "neutral" as it was, ignored an organization of life which deprived the large majority of mankind of its freedom. In the course of its effort to establish the physical and mathematical structure of the universe, it had also to disclaim any con cern for the concrete individual, the perceptible "body." Such a process of abstraction was fully validated by its result-a logical system of propositions governing the methodical utilization and transformation of nature, with the aim of turning it into a universe controlled by human power.

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1965
Comes the Revolution

"Comes the Revolution: Reply to M. Berman's review of One-Dimensional Man," Partisan Review, 32 (Winter 1965): 159-160.

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1965
Einige Streitfragen

"Einige Streitfragen," Praxis, 1, nos. 2 and 3 (1965): 372-379.

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1965
Nachwort von Herbert Marcuse

Walter Benjamin (1892-1940), Zur Kritik der Gewalt und andere Aufsätze. Nachwort von Herbert Marcuse (Frankfurt: Suhrkamp, 1965), 106 p.

    Dieser Band vereinigt fünf Texte, die in einem inneren Zusammenhang stehen; sie zeigen die Entwicklung zentraler Motive von Benjamins Denken auf. Eingeleitet wird er durch eine sehr frühe Studie Über das Programm der kommenden Philosophie. Es folgen die Aufsätze Zur Kritik der Gewalt, wo Benjamins Schicksalsbegriff Gestalt gewinnt, und Schicksal und Charakter, eine Arbeit, die er selbst als ein Modell der ihm vorschwebenden philosophischen Theorie bezeichnet hat. In zwei Texten aus dem Nachlaß, den Geschichtsphilosophischen Thesen und dem Theologisch-politischen Fragment, kehren die Gedanken des frühen Benjamin wieder, auf einer anderen Stufe der Reflexion.

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1965
One-Dimensional Man

One of the most important texts of modern times, Herbert Marcuse's analysis and image of a one-dimensional man in a one-dimensional society has shaped many young radicals' way of seeing and experiencing life. Published in 1964, it fast became an ideological bible for the emergent New Left. As Douglas Kellner notes in his introduction, Marcuse's greatest work was a 'damning indictment of contemporary Western societies, capitalist and communist.' Yet it also expressed the hopes of a radical philosopher that human freedom and happiness could be greatly expanded beyond the regimented thought and behaviour prevalent in established society. For those who held the reigns of power Marcuse's call to arms threatened civilization to its very core. For many others however, it represented a freedom hitherto unimaginable

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Translations: Deutsch Ελληνικά français Indonesia português

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1965
Repressive Tolerance

Robert Paul Wolff, Barrington Moore, Jr., and Herbert Marcuse, A Critique of Pure Tolerance (Boston: Beacon Press, 1969), pp. 95-137.

Marcuse argues that "the realization of the objective of tolerance" requires "intolerance toward prevailing policies, attitudes, opinions, and the extension of tolerance to policies, attitudes, and opinions which are outlawed or suppressed." He makes the case for "liberating tolerance", which would consist of intolerance to right-wing movements and toleration of left-wing movements.

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1965
Socialist Humanism

"Socialist Humanism," in Socialist Humanism: An International Symposium, edited by Erich Fromm (Garden City, N.Y.: Doubleday, 1965), pp. 107-117.

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1965
Statement on Vietnam

"Statement on Vietnam," Partisan Review, 32 (Fall 1965): 646-649.

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1966
Ethics and Revolution

"Ethics and Revolution," in Ethics and Society: Original Essays on Contemporary Moral Problems, edited by R. T. de George (Garden City, N.Y.: Anchor, 1966), pp. 133-147.

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1966
The Individual in the Great Society

"The Individual in the Great Society" in: Alternatives 1(1966), issue 1: 14-16, 20 and issue 2: 29-35.

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1966
The Rationality of Philosophy

"The Rationality of Philosophy"--San Diego lecture published 2017 in: Transvaluation of Values

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1966
Sommes-nous-déjà des hommes?

"Sommes-nous-déjà des hommes?" Partisans, 28 (April 1966): 21-29.

    Abstract:
  • French:
    Nous sommes engagés dans un progrès technique, mais il ne s'agit que d'un progrès quantitatif, d'une croissance quantitative, d'un développement quantitatif. Il n'y a pas de saut qualitatif, de changement qualitatif. Dans notre société qui semble exclure toute alternative essentielle, on s'efforce de réaliser une mise au pas plus ou moins parfaite de l'opposition, une assurance contre tout changement radical des formes de l'existence, l'intégration des contraires, qui demeurent encore au sein de cette société. Et tout ceci se passe dans une dimension en profondeur, où même la structure instinctuelle de l'individu est socialement modifiée et manipulée. Cette société fermée est en même temps une société totale. Le progrès, la croissance et la richesse reproduisent la dépendance de l'homme vis-à-vis de l'appareil. Le rationalisme technologique est utilisé comme moyen de domination, c'est-à-dire comme moyen de conserver des formes d'existence données, mais surannées. La productivité croissante dont la société est capable n'est pas utilisée pour l'apaisement de la lutte pour l'existence, mais pour son intensification et pour sa perpétuation. Sommes-nous déjà des hommes?
  • English:
    We are engaged in technical progress, but it is only quantitative progress, quantitative growth, quantitative development. There is no qualitative leap, no qualitative change. In our society which seems to exclude all essential alternatives, we strive to achieve a more or less perfect alignment of the opposition, insurance against any radical change in the forms of existence, the integration of opposites, which remain still within this company. And all of this happens in a deep dimension, where even the instinctual structure of the individual is socially modified and manipulated. This closed society is at the same time a total society. Progress, growth and wealth reproduce the dependence of man on the apparatus. Technological rationalism is used as a means of domination, that is to say, as a means of preserving given but outdated forms of existence. The increasing productivity of which society is capable is not used to appease the struggle for existence, but for its intensification and for its perpetuation. Are we already men?

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1966
Vietnam: Analyse eines Exempels

"Vietnam: Analyse eines Exempels," Neue Kritik, 36/37(June-Aug. 1966),: 30-40.

  • Statement from May 22, 1966 attacking U.S. policy in Vietnam. May have been at a conference organized by the Sozialistischer Deutscher Studentenbund.
  • Reprinted in: Wolfgang Kraushaar (ed.)., Frankfurter Schule und Studentenbewegung: Von der Flaschenpost zum Molotowcocktail, 1946-1995 (Hamburg, 1998), vol. 2, pp. 205-9.

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1966
Zur Geschichte der Dialektik

"Zur Geschichte der Dialektik," Sowjetsystem und Demokratische Gesellschaft, 1 (1966): 1192-1211.

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1967
Art in the One-Dimensional Society

"Art in the One-Dimensional Society," Arts Magazine 41:7(May 1967).

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1967
Die Gesellschaft als Kunstwerk

"Die Gesellschaft als Kunstwerk," Neues Forum vol. 14, no. 167-168 (Nov /Dez. 1967).

  • Planned publication in vol. 5 of Herbert's Nachgelassene Schriften: Kunst und Befreiung, (Lüneburg: zu Kampen, 2006?).

Translations: português

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1967
Faschismus und Kapitalismus: Theorien über die sozialien Ursprünge und die Funktion des Faschismus

1967 Wolfgang Abendroth (ed.); Otto Bauer, Herbert Marcuse, Arthur Rosenberg [et al.] Faschismus und Kapitalismus: Theorien über die sozialien Ursprünge und die Funktion des Faschismus eingeleitet von Kurt Kliem [et al.] (Frankfurt, Europäische Verlagsanstalt, 1967), 185 p.

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1967
The Inner Logic of American Policy in Vietnam

"The Inner Logic of American Policy in Vietnam," in Teach-Ins, USA: Reports, Opinions, Documents, edited by Louis Menashe and Ronald Radosh (New York: Praeger, 1967), pp. 65-67.

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1967
Ist die Idee der Revolution eine Mystifikation?

"Ist die Idee der Revolution eine Mystifikation?" Kursbuch, 9 (1967): 1-6.

  • Translated as "The Question of Revolution," New Left Review, 45 (1967): 3-7.
  • 1967 review of Love's Body by Norman O. Brown, in: Commentary (February 1967)[cited in R. Kimball, The Long March, p. 168]

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1967
Liberation from the Affluent Society

"Liberation from the Affluent Society" David Cooper (ed.), in: The Dialectics of Liberation (Harmondsworth/Baltimore: Penguin, 1968), 175-192.

  • Presentation at the London Dialectics of Liberation conference (book introduction)
  • Sound clip (2:20 mins; 417K .wav file), and added 12/8/07: full sound recording (.wmp files)
  • 12/8/07: 12/(17)/07 Nation column by Alexander Cockburn "The Dialectics of Revolution ... Uh, Recycling" (jpg scan). He includes a cute anecdote about when he cooked dinner for Herbert & Inge the night before Herbert's talk.
  • 2015 republication: by Verso. With contributions by Gregory Bateson, Stokely Carmichael, John Gerassi, Lucien Goldmann, Paul Goodman, Jules Henry, R.D. Laing, Herbert Marcuse, and Paul Sweezy. This volume is part of Verso's Radical Thinkers series.
    Tagline:
    "A revolutionary compilation of speeches which produced a political groundwork for many of the radical movements in the following decades."

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Translations: español

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1967
The Obsolescence of Marxism?

"The Obsolescence of Marxism?" in Marx and the Western World, edited by Nikolaus Lobkowicz (Notre Dame, Ind.: University of Notre Dame Press, 1967), pp. 409-417.

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1967
On Changing the World: A Reply to Karl Miller

"On Changing the World: A Reply to Karl Miller," Monthly Review, 19 (October 1967): 42-48.

    Abstract:
    The review of One Dimensional Man, written under the pseudonym of Karl Miller (Monthly Review, June 1967) would not deserve a reply, were it not for the fact that it appeared in Monthly Review, a magazine devoted to the development of independent socialist thought. In my view, this task demands the rebuttal of all attempts to stifle socialist thought by the uncritical use of concepts inadequate to the understanding of prevalent social forces and tendencies. I have been anxious to see a critique of One Dimensional Man which would have shown that I was wrong, that I overrated the cohesion and power of advanced capitalism and underrated the strength and the prospects of the opposition. Karl Miller offers the caricature of such a critique: he misrepresents my position, builds up straw men which he then violently attacks, pours out angry invective instead of engaging in a substantial discussion.

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1967
Philosophy and Revolution

Philosophy and Revolution (three essays, from 1930, 1932, 1929)

  • German: Philosophie und Revolution
  • French: Philosophie et révolution: trois études; traduit de l'allemand par Cornélius Heim (Paris: Denoël-Gonthier,1971), 158 p.

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1967
Protest and Futility

"Protest and Futility," lecture at Berkeley, published 2017 in Transvaluation of Values.

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1967
The Responsibility of Science

"The Responsibility of Science," in The Responsibility of Power: Historical Essays in Honor of Hajo Holborn, edited by Leonard Krieger and Fritz Stern (Garden City, N.Y.: Doubleday, 1967), pp. 439-444.

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1967
Thoughts on the Defense of Gracchus Babeuf

"Thoughts on the Defense of Gracchus Babeuf," in The Defense of Gracchus Babeuf Before the High Court of Vendôme, by François Noël Babeuf, edited and translated by John Anthony Scott (Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 1967), pp. 96- 105.

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1967
Ziele, Formen und Aussichten der Studentopposition

"Ziele, Formen und Aussichten der Studentopposition," Das Argument, (1967): 398-408.

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1967
Zum Begriff der Negation in der Dialektik

"Zum Begriff der Negation in der Dialektik," Filosoficky casopis, 15, no. 3 (1967): 375-379.

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1968
Aggressivität in der gegenwärtigen Industriegessellschaft

"Aggressivität in der gegenwärtigen Industriegessellschaft" in: Aggression und Anpassung in der Industriegesellschaft (Frankfurt: Suhrkamp, 1968).

  • other essays in collection: other essays in collection:
    A. Rapoport, "Das Klasseninteresse der Intellektuellen und die Machtelite"
    K. Horn, "Über den Zusammenhang zwischen Angst und politischer Apathie"
    A. Mitscherlich, "Aggression und Anpassung"
    D. Senghaas, "Aggressivität und Gewalt: Thesen zur Abschreckungspolitik"
    M. Markovíc, "Möglichkeiten einer radikalen Humanisierung der Industriektultur"
    Bibliographische Notiz (p. 163)
  • Revised and expanded version of a talk that Herbert gave in 1956 at the Chicago Psychiatric Society.
  • revised and expanded version of a talk that Herbert gave in 1956 (see above) at the Chicago Psychiatric Society
  • first published in translation in Neue Rundschau 78(1967), 7-21.
  • also published in Kultur und Gesellschaft, vol. 1 (Suhrkamp, 1965)
  • review by Bernd P. Löwe (Halle) in: Deutsche Zeitschrift für Philosophie 19:9 (1971) p.1152-1159 ( pdf ) East German
  • Spanish: La agresividad en la sociedad industrial avanzada y otros ensayos (Madrid : Alianza Editorial, 1971), 135 p.
  • Portugese: Liberdade e agressão na sociedade tecnológica ( pdf )

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1968
Friede als Utopie

"Friede als Utopie," Neues Forum, 15 (November- December 1968): 705-707.

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1968
Negations: Essays in Critical Theory

Negations: Essays in Critical Theory; with translations from the German by Jeremy J. Shapiro (London: Penguin, 1968; Boston: Beacon, 1969; London: Free Association, 1988), 290 p. [UCSB HM101 .M345]

    Contents:
  • The struggle against liberalism in the totalitarian view of the state. [originally in: ZfS 3(1934)]
    The concept of essence (pp. 43-87). [originally in: Zfs 5(1936)]; pp. 47-51 ; 55-62
  • The affirmative character of culture (pp. 88-133). [originally in: ZfS 6(1937)]; pp. 104-107
    Philosophy and critical theory (pp. 134-158). [originally in: ZfS 6(1937)]; pp. 147-154
    On hedonism. [originally in: ZfS 7(1938)] Industrialization and capitalism in the work of Max Weber. ( text in Portugese )
    Love mystified; a critique of Norman O. Brown and a reply to Herbert Marcuse by Norman O. Brown.
  • Aggressiveness in advanced industrial society.

    Summary in The Review of Metaphysics 23:4(June 1970), p. 745.

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1968
Psychoanalyse und Politik

Psychoanalyse und Politik (Frankfurt, Europäische Verlagsanstalt, 1968), 78 p.

  • Contents:
    -- Trieblehre und Freiheit. [in Frankfurter IfS (ed.), Sociologica, 1955)]
    --Die Idee des Fortschritts im Licht der Psychoanalyse.
    --Das Problem der Gewalt in der Opposition.
    --Das Ende der Utopie.
  • Spanish: Psicoanálisis y Política (Barcelona: Ediciones Península, 1968, 1969, 1973), 155 p.; prologo de Carlos Castilla del Pino
  • Portugese: A noção de progresso à luz da psicanálise ( A full text at antivalor )

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1968
The Paris Rebellion

"The Paris Rebellion," Peace News (28 June 1968): 6-7.

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1968
The People's Choice

"The People's Choice," co-author of letter to the editor of The New York Review of Books 11:3(August 22, 1968).

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1968
Zur Situation der Neuen Linken

"Zur Situation der Neuen Linken," Manuskript eines am 4. Dezember 1968 in New York von Herbert Marcuse gehaltenen Festvortrages.

  • Publication in English in 1969.

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1969
Correspondence on the German Student Movement

Theodor W. Adorno and Herbert Marcuse, “Correspondence on the German Student Movement,” trans. Esther Leslie, New Left Review, no. 233 (January/February 1999): 123-136. (introduction p. 118-123).

  • Presents the correspondence between social philosophers Theodor Adorno and Herbert Marcuse focusing on student movement in Germany in the year 1969. Adorno's account of an incident when student activists occupied a university building; Marcuse's expression of disagreement with Adorno's decision and action regarding the incident.Focuses on the correspondence between social philosophers Herbert Marcuse and Theodor Adorno in the year 1969. Letters' focus on student activism in Germany; Marcuse's experience while lecturing in Italy; Adorno's legal encounter with German student activist Hans-Jurgen Krahl.

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1969
An Essay on Liberation

Herbert Marcuse, An essay on liberation (Boston: Beacon Press) 1969

In this concise and startling book, the author of One-Dimensional Man argues that the time for utopian speculation has come. Marcuse argues that the traditional conceptions of human freedom have been rendered obsolete by the development of advanced industrial society. Social theory can no longer content itself with repeating the formula, “from each according to his ability, to each according to his needs,” but must now investigate the nature of human needs themselves. Marcuse’s claim is that even if production were controlled and determined by the workers, society would still be repressive—unless the workers themselves had the needs and aspirations of free men. Ranging from philosophical anthropology to aesthetics An Essay on Liberation attempts to outline—in a highly speculative and tentative fashion—the new possibilities for human liberation. The Essay contains the following chapters: A Biological Foundation for Socialism?, The New Sensibility, Subverting Forces—in Transition, and Solidarity.

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Translations: Deutsch español suomi français hrvatski Indonesia italiano Nederlands norsk português svenska Türkçe

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1969
Ideen zu einer kritischen Theorie der Gesellschaft

Ideen zu einer kritischen Theorie der Gesellschaft (Frankfurt: Suhrkamp, 1969)(es 300).

  • collection of older works
  • Includes: "Zum Begriff der Negation in der Dialektik,"185-190
  • French translation: Pour une théorie critique de la société; traduit de l'allemand par Cornélius Heim (Paris: Denoël-Gonthier,1971), 224 p.

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1969
Marx's Concept of Revolution

"Marx's Concept of Revolution", New Left Review (July 1969) [Ollman]

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1969
Nicht einfach zerstören

"Nicht einfach zerstören," Neues Forum, 16 (August- September 1969): 485-488.

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1969
On the New Left

"On the New Left," in The New Left: A Documentary History, edited by Massimor Teodori (Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill, 1969), pp. 468-473.

    See German translation of Dec. 1968 presentation "Zur Situation der Neuen Linke."

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1969
Re-examination of the Concept of Revolution

"Re-examination of the Concept of Revolution," in Marx and Contemporary Scientific Thought: Marx et la pensée scientifique contemporaine (The Hague: Mouton, 1969).

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1969
Reflexion zu Theodor W. Adorno - Aus einem Gespräch mit Michaela Seiffe

"Reflexion zu Theodor W. Adorno - Aus einem Gespräch mit Michaela Seiffe," in: Titel, Thesen, Temperamente: Ein Kulturmagazin (Hessischer Rundfunk, Abteilung Fernsehen, Kunst und Literatur), Sendung am 24. August 1969. Published in: Hermann Schweppenhäuser (ed.), Theodor W. Adorno Zum Gedächtnis: Eine Sammlung (Frankfurt: Suhrkamp, 1971), 47-51.

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1969
Revolutionary Subject and Self-Government

"Revolutionary Subject and Self-Government," Praxis, 5, no. 2 (1969): 326-327.

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1969
Sociedad Industrial y el Marxismo

Sociedad Industrial y el Marxismo (Buenos Aires: Editorial Quintinaria, 1969).

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1969
Herbert Marcuse speech in Sproul Plaza

Herbert Marcuse speech in Sproul Plaza [sound recording]: University of California, Berkeley, 1969 Oct. 24. 1 sound tape reel : analog, 3 3/4 ips, 2 track ; 5 in.

  • Speech relates to Angela Davis, University of California and students' roles in society.
  • 1 sound tape reel :; analog, 3 3/4 ips, 2 track; 5 in.
  • Abstract: Speech relates to Angela Davis, University of California and students' roles in society. Transcript also available. [UC Berkeley Hardin B. Jones papers]
  • Also 1 page flyer [worldcat: Northern Ill.]: "Angela Davis, lecturer in philosophy, UCLA, recently fired by the regents for her membership in the communist party, and reinstated by the courts, Herbert Marcuse, professor of philosophy, UC, San Diego, author, One-dimensional man, Eros and civilization, Reason and revolution, Essay on liberation"

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1969
Student Protest is Non-violent Next to Society Itself

"Student Protest is Non-violent Next to Society Itself," New York Times Magazine (4 May 1969): 137. (text on Nov. 18, 2010 blog by "Savonarola")

    Herbert argues that police intervention in civil disobdience actions on college campuses are justified only when their education mission is threatened.

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1969
Student Protest is Nonviolent Next to the Society Itself

"Student Protest Is Nonviolent Next to the Society Itself," New York Times, p. sm137.

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1969
The Obsolescence of Psychoanalysis

The Obsolescence of Psychoanalysis (Chicago: Black Swan Press, 1969?), 15 p [UCB][title of a lecture at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association in 1963; published in Five Lectures in 1970, where it is listed as "previously unpublished in English".]

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1969
The Realm of Freedom and the Realm of Necessity

"The Realm of Freedom and the Realm of Necessity: A Reconsideration," Praxis, 5, no. 1(1969): 20-25.

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1969
The Relevance of Reality

"The Relevance of Reality," presidential address to the Pacific Branch of the American Philosophical Association in Portland, OR, March 29, 1969. Published in: Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 42(1968), pp. 39, 40-50

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1970
Apocalypse or apocrypha?

Apocalypse or apocrypha? Herbert Marcuse, his prescription for the next world. [sound recording] Music Pub. No. Center for Cassette Studies 080-24283 (North Hollywood, Calif.: Center for Cassette Studies, [197-]) 1 sound cassette (48 min.): analog, 2 track. [GTU]

  • Marcuse delineates his neo-Marxist concepts, analyzing the utilization of existing resources by both East and West, the effects of the Third World revolution, the inevitable self-destruction of the consumer society, and the liberation of man through "social idealism."

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1970
Art as a Form of Reality

"Art as a Form of Reality," in: Fry, Edward (ed.), On the Future of Art (New York: Viking, 1970).

    Republished in New Left Review in 1972.

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1970
The End of Utopia

"The End of Utopia," in: Five Lectures: Psychoanalysis, Politics, and Utopia; trans. Jeremy Shapiro and Shierry Weber (Boston: Beacon, 1970), 62-81.

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Translations: Deutsch français hrvatski italiano svenska Türkçe

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1970
Humanismus--gibt's den noch

"Humanismus--gibt's den noch?" Neues Forum, 17 (April 1970): 349-353.

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1970
Marxism and the New Humanity: An Unfinished Revolution

"Marxism and the New Humanity: An Unfinished Revolution," in Marxism and Radical Religion: Essays Toward a Revolutionary Humanism, edited by John C. Raines and Thomas Dean (Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1970), pp. 3-10.

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1970
Only a Free Arab World Can Co-exist with a Free Israel

"Only a Free Arab World Can Co-exist with a Free Israel," Israel Horizons (June-July 1970): 17.

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1970
Prophets of Deceit: A Study of the Techniques of the American Agitator

Leo Lowenthal and Norman Gutermann, Prophets of Deceit: A Study of the Techniques of the American Agitator, foreword by Marcuse (Palo Alto, Cal.: Pacific Books, 1970).

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1970
Five Lectures: Psychoanalysis, Politics, and Utopia

Five Lectures: Psychoanalysis, Politics, and Utopia. Translations by Jeremy J. Shapiro and Shierry M. Weber (Boston, Beacon Press, 1970), 109 p.

  • Four of these lectures were translated from the author's Psychoanalyse und Politik (Frankfurt, 1968).
  • Includes bibliographical references
  • Contents:
    --Freedom and Freud's theory of instincts, 1-27 [1956 lecture in German, publ. 1957, 1968]
    --Progress and Freud's theory of instincts, 28-43
    --The obsolescence of the Freudian concept of man, 44-61 [1963 lecture at Am. Pol. Sci. Assoc.]
    -- The End of Utopia , 62-69, discussion 69-82 [ 1967 Berlin lecture]
    -- The problem of violence and the radical opposition , 83-94, discussion 94-108 [1967 Berlin lecture]
  • reviewed by Larry L. Adams in: Western Political Quarterly 23:4(Dec. 1970), pp. 903- 904
  • Turkish translation of The End of Utopia, " Utopyanin sonu," by Dogan Baris Kilinc, in the philosophical journal, Bibliothec 2(2007), 56-59. (4 page pdf)
  • review: Eliseo Vivas , "By and On Marcuse" Modern Age 15:1 (1971:Winter), 80-89 (pdf) review of Five Lectures and books by MacIntyre and Robert Marks.

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1970
Riot and Representation: The Significance of the Chicano Riot

"Riot and Representation: The Significance of the Chicano Riot," Triton Times (November 1970).

According to an article in the Nov. 1970 Triton Times (student newspaper of the University of California at San Diego) Herbert did NOT write "Riot and Representation: The Significance of the Chicano Riot," which was published under his name.

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1971
Aggression: Das dritte Gespräch

"Aggression: Das dritte Gespräch," interview with Friedrich Hacker on Dec. 9, 1970

  • Published in Friedrich Hacker (1914-), Aggression: Die Brutalisierung der modernen Welt. with a foreword by Konrad Lorenz (Vienna, Munich, Zurich: Molden, 1971), 345-359; (Hamburg: Rowohlt, 1973).
  • Discusses offensive and defensive aggression.

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1971
Charles Reich as Revolutionary Ostrich

"Charles Reich as Revolutionary Ostrich," in The Con III Controversy: The Critics Look at The Greening of America, edited by Philip Nobile (New York: Pocket Books, 1971), pp. 15-17.

    Ralph Dumain offer the following commentary:
    "This review was published in a book of criticism of Charles Reich's THE GREENING OF AMERICA. I don't know how many of you are old enough--or I presume American--to remember this awful pop intellectual explanation of the countercultural rebellion of the '60s. (I had an English teacher who claimed he was Consciousnes III, I think because he rode a bicycle, whereas I thought he was still struggling to master Consciousness I.) While Marcuse's essay is a fairly superficial knock-off, it does occasion a remembrance of the competing ideologies of the time, and especially the lite middlebrow fare peddled to the liberal educated middle class, which should serve as a reminder of what kind of literature the culture industry enables for a popular audience. I'm not sure who the first pop intellectual was--I do remember being nauseated by Marshall McLuhan before Reich, Roszak, and others came along. I think pop intellectuals bear some ideological scrutiny, though times have indeed changed and the winds of fashion are blowing their farts in different directions. Pop intellectual products fashioned for middlebrow audiences are revealing of the forces of commodification, fetishism, ideology, mystification, and fragmentation affecting the intelligentsia. Critique itself becomes commodified, not just in terms of marketing but in intellectual content. The more superficial it is, the more it mimics the ideological forms of appearance of its object, the easier it is to generate as well as to sell. It provides us one more layer we have to cut through. Sometimes two, as with Curtis White's THE MIDDLE MIND, a piece of crap that mimics the very middlebrow culture it excoriates.
    As you may recall, Marcuse also faced off against more serious scholars hawking a mystical view of cultural revolution, such as Norman O. Brown, who wrote a serious book, LIFE AGAINST DEATH, with a panoramic vision in competition with EROS AND CIVILIZATION, and a bunch of crap much later on.

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1971
Dear Angela

"Dear Angela," Ramparts, 9 (February 1971): 22.

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1971
Letters to Chicago Surrealists

Letters to Chicago Surrealists, October 1971-March 1973, published by Franklin Rosemont, "Herbert Marcuse and the Surrealist Revolution," in: Arsenal 4(1989), 31-38, 39-47.

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1971
The Movement in a New Era of Repression

This essay is the transcript of a speech delivered by Marcuse at the University of California, Berkeley, on February 3, 1971. It has been edited for readability only.

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1971
Per una nova definicio de la cultura

Per una nova definicio de la cultura (Barcelona: Edicions 62, [Oct] 1971), 76 p.

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1971
Reflections on Calley

"Reflections on Calley," New York Times, p. 45.

    Has a massive sense of guilt turned into its opposite, a strident identification with the crime and criminal, seeing it as justified? Herbert looks at the public support for Calley.

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1971
The Concept of Negation in the Dialectic

"The Concept of Negation in the Dialectic," notes, in Telos no. 8 (Summer 1971).

    Abstract:
    I believe we all agree that, in terms of the original or even the expanded concepts of Marxian theory, determining the content of the present historical period and particularly the developments of late capitalism presents certain difficulties. Rather, we can do so, but only at the risk of generating additional difficulties. If the same theory can equally well deal with the development A as well as non-A, prosperity as well as crisis, revolution as well as the absence of revolution, or the radicalization of the working-class as well as its integration into the existing system, then although this may indicate the validity of the theory, it also indicates its indifference.

Publisher's Page

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1971
The Movement in a New Era of Repression: An Assessment

"The Movement in a New Era of Repression: An Assessment," Berkeley Journal of Sociology, 16 (1971-1972): 1-14. transcript of a speech delivered by Marcuse at the University of California, Berkeley, on February 3, 1971.

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1972
A Reply to Lucien Goldmann

"A Reply to Lucien Goldmann," Partisan Review, 38 (Winter 1971-1972): 397-400.

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1972
Art and Revolution

"Art and Revolution," Partisan Review, 39 (Spring 1972): 174-187.

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1972
Art as a Form of Reality

"Art as a Form of Reality," New Left Review 74(1972)

  • Originally published in 1970 in a collection edited by E. Fry.

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1972
Art in the One-Dimensional Society

"Art in the One-Dimensional Society," in Radical Perspectives in the Arts, edited by Lee Baxandall (Harmondsworth, U.K.: Penguin, 1972), pp. 53-67.

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1972
Counterrevolution and Revolt

In this book Herbert Marcuse makes clear that capitalism is now reorganizing itself to meet the threat of a revolution that, if realized, would be the most radical of revolutions: the first truly world-historical revolution. Capitalism’s counterrevolution, however, is largely preventive, and in the Western world altogether preventive. Yet capitalism is producing its own grave-diggers, and Marcuse suggests that their faces may be very different from those of the wretched of the earth.

The future revolution will be characterized by its enlarged scope, for not only the economic and political structure, not only class relatoins, but also humanity’s relation to nature (both human and external nature) tend toward radical transformation. For the author, the “liberation of nature” is the connecting thread between the economic-political and the cultural revolution, between “changing the world” and personal emancipation.

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Wikipedia page

Translations: Deutsch español français português Türkçe

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1972
Das ist noch Utopie

Jerusalem Post , "Das ist noch Utopie" .

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1972
From Luther to Popper

From Luther to Popper; translated by Joris de Bres (London : NLB, 1972; London: Verso Editions, 1983), 227 p.

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1972
Studies in Critical Philosophy

Studies in Critical Philosophy; translated [from the German and French] by Joris de Bres (London: NLB, 1972), 227 p.

    Contents
  • The foundation of historical materialism. [1932 article, discussed by Raya Dunayevskaya in her: (New Jersey : Humanities Press, 1982; Berlin: Argument, 1998), p. 81]
    (scan of page)
  • A study on authority.
  • Sartre's existentialism.
  • Karl Popper and the problem of historical laws.
  • Freedom and the historical imperative.
  • Review by Doniela, W. V, Australasian Journal of Philosophy, 51 (1973), 267-269.
    (pdf)

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1972
The defense of Gracchus Babeuf before the High Court of Vendome

The defense of Gracchus Babeuf before the High Court of Vendome, edited & translated by John Anthony Scott; with an essay by Herbert Marcuse & illustrations by Thomas Cornell. (New York: Schocken, 1972), 112 p.

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1973
A Revolution in Values

"A Revolution in Values," in Political Ideologies, edited by James A. Gould and Willis H. Truitt (New York: Macmillan, 1973), pp. 331-336.

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1973
Controversy

"Controversy," by Schneier E, Weidenbaum ML, Marcuse H, de Sola Pool I, Nisbet R, Umpleby SA, in: Society 10:6 (Sept. 1973), 19-27.
[UCePub Jan 2016]

Publisher's Page

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1973
Existentialistische Marx-Interpretation

Herbert Marcuse, Alfred Schmidt, Existentialistische Marx-Interpretation (Frankfurt: Europäische Verlagsanstalt, 1973), 142 p.

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1973
When Law and Morality Stand in the Way

"When Law and Morality Stand in the Way," Society , 10 (September-October 1973): 23-24.

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1974
Marxism and Feminism

"Marxism and Feminism," Women's Studies, 2, no. 3 (1974): 279-288.

  • This was a lecture delivered at Stanford University on March 7, 1974. The text was written and re-written after intensive, rigorous and often heated discussions with women. In these discussions I gained insight into largely neglected problems of socialism and into the radical potential of the Women's Movement as a subversive force. With grateful appreciation, this text is dedicated to: Catherine Asmann; Carol Becker; Anne-Marie Feenberg; Ruth George; Antonia Kaus and Susan Orlofsky.
  • It was reprinted in 2006: Differences 2006 17(1):147-157.
    (purchase page)
  • It was also reprinted in: Collected Papers of Herbert Marcuse, Vol. 3 The New Left and the 1960s, edited by Douglas Kellner, chapter XII.

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1975
Fragments

Fragments (excerpt from One-Dimensional Man), in: George Steiner, Leszek Kolakowski, Johan Huizinga, Philip Rieff, Lionel Trilling, Herbert Marcuse, Roland Barthes, Witold Gombrowicz, in: Salmagundi 29 (Spring 1975), pp. 5-14.

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1975
Zeit-Messungen: Drei Vorträge und ein Interview

Zeit-Messungen: Drei Vorträge und ein Interview (Frankfurt: Suhrkamp, 1975, 1978), 68 pages.

    includes translation "Marxismus und Feminismus," revised version of a lecture held on March 7, 1974 at the Center for Research on Women at Stanford University. French: Actuels (Paris: Éditions Galilee, 1976), 102 p. also in Schriften, Bd. 9. Spanish: Calas en nuestro tiempo (Barcelona: Icaria, 1976), 106 pages.
    Contents: Marxismo y feminismo.--Teoría y praxis.--La nueva izquierda.--Una entrevista. USA: Cuestión de organización y sujeto revolucionario

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1976
On the Problem of the Dialectic

“On the Problem of the Dialectic,” Telos 27 (Spring 1976).

  • Morton Schoolman, “Introduction to Marcuse’s ‘On the Problem of the Dialectic’,” Telos 27 (Spring 1976).

Publisher's Page

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1976
Opinion in Simon Wiesenthal’s "The Sunflower: On the Possibilities and Limits of Forgiveness"

For the 1976 edition of Simon Wiesenthal's autobiographical story The Sunflower, thirty-two "eminent persons" gave their opinions about whether Wiesenthal should have forgiven the SS man who requested it of the young Jewish Wiesenthal as the SS man lay dying. Herbert's response is below.

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1976
Un nouvel ordre

"Un nouvel ordre," Le Monde Diplomatique, 268 (June 1976).

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1977
Die Permanenz der Kunst: Wider eine bestimmte marxistische Ästhetik: Ein Essay

Die Permanenz der Kunst: Wider eine bestimmte marxistische Ästhetik: Ein Essay (Munich: Hanser, 1977), 77 pgs.

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1977
Enttäuschung

"Enttäuschung," in: Erinnerung an Martin Heidegger, edited by Gunther Neske (Pfullingen: Neske, 1977), pp. 162-163.

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1977
Interview with R. Kearney

Interview with R. Kearney , in: Crane Bag 1:1(1977), 76-85. [UCepub Jan 2016]

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1977
Murder Is Not a Political Weapon

Herbert Marcuse, "Murder Is Not a Political Weapon", translated by Jeffrey Herf, in: New German Critique, 12 (Fall 1977), pp. 7-8.

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Translations: Deutsch español

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1978
Gespräche mit Herbert Marcuse

Gespräche mit Herbert Marcuse. (Edition Suhrkamp, 1978, 2002)

  • Theorie und Politik (July 1977 in Starnberg, with Habermas, Heinz Lubasz, and Tilman Spengler)
  • Weiblichkeitsbilder (July 1977 in Pontresina, Switzerland [Herbert's favorite vacation spot], with Silvia Bovenschen and Marianne Schuller)
  • Salecina (1975 interview and summer 1977 conversation with Erica Sherover (Herbert's third wife), Berthold Rothschild, Theo Pinkus)
  • Radikale Philosophie: Die Frankfurter Schule (undated BBC broadcasts, with Lubasz, Alfred Schmidt, Karl Popper, Ralf Dahrendorf, Rudi Dutschke)
  • "So sieht in der bürgerlichen Gesellschaft der Fortschritt aus..." (Nov. 1977 in La Jolla, with Hans Christoph Buch).
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1978
Lyric Poetry after Auschwitz

"Lyric Poetry after Auschwitz" (unfinished ms., published posthumously)

Found in the Marcuse archive. It consists of four pages in English, followed by eleven pages in German, some fragmentary, and two rather fragmentary pages in English. It is not clear what the origins of this article are, what Marcuse intended it for, and why he wrote first in English, then in German, reverting in the final pages to English. It is found in the Herbert Marcuse archive under the number 560.00 with the description “Entwurf La Jolla, 1978.”
A German version of the text with the title “Lyrik nach Auschwitz” was published in Peter-Erwin Jansen’s edited edition Kunst und Befreiung (Lüneburg: zu Klampen, 2000), pp. 157-66. Published in Douglas Kellner (ed.), Art and Liberation (2007)

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1978
Protosozialismus und Spätkapitalismus

"Protosozialismus und Spätkapitalismus," in: kritik - Zeitschrift für sozialistische Diskussion, 6:19(1978).

1979: "Protosozialismus und Spätkapitalismus: Versuch einer Revolutionstheoretischen Synthese von Bahros Ansatz," Kritik, 6:19 (Berlin, 1979[1978?]), 5-27,

  • Kurz nach dem Erscheinen von Rudolf Bahros »Die Alternative. Zur Kritik des real existieren den Sozialismus« (Köln/Frankfurt 1977) veröffentlichte Herbert Marcuse den hier dokumentierten Aufsatz zu Bahros Werk
  • "Protosocialism and Late Capitalism: Toward a Theoretical Synthesis Based on Bahro's Analysis," by Herbert Marcuse (trans. by Michel Vale, Annemarie Feenberg, Andrew Feenberg, Erica Sherover Marcuse), in: International Journal of Politics 10: 2/3, Rudolf Bahro: Critical Responses (Summer - Fall, 1980), pp. 25-48.

  • translated as "Protosocialism and Late Capitalism: Toward a Theoretical Synthesis"
  • response to: Rudolf Bahro, Die Alternative. Zur Kritik des real existieren den Sozialismus (Köln/Frankfurt 1977)(Heft Nr. 19, 6. Jahrgang, 1978)
  • Based on Bahro's "Analysis" in Rudolf Bahro: Critical Responses, edited by Ulf Wolter (White Plains, N.Y.: M. E. Sharpe, 1980), pp. 25-48. [also published in M.E. Sharpe's Journal for International Politics , 1980]
  • Spanish : "Acerca del análisis de Rudolf Bahro," Universidad Autónoma de Sinaloa, México, 1981.

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1978
The Aesthetic Dimension: Toward a Critique of Marxist Aesthetics

The Aesthetic Dimension: Toward a Critique of Marxist Aesthetics (Boston: Beacon, 1978), 88 pages.

Translation of Die Permanenz der Kunst (Munich: Hanser, 1977). English version translated and revised by Herbert Marcuse and Erica Shereover © 1978. (Boston: Beacon Press, 1978), 88 pages.

  • expanded translation of Permanenz der Kunst (1977)
  • Reader Elliott Green (German major at Princeton, MPhil student in Development Studies at the London School of Economics) wrote on Amazon: "Herbert Marcuse, original member of the so-called 'Frankfurt School', here presents a critique of Marxist aesthetics in one of his last books. Although only 72 pages long, the book is powerful in its argument against the orthodox Marxist view that 'art represents its the interests and world outlook of particular social classes.' Marcuse argues for the importance of art in itself, apart from its source, writing, 'the criteria for the progressive character of art are given only in the work itself as a whole: in what it says and how it says it.' He truly believes that art's place in the world is not to change the world directly but to influence how people perceive the world and thereby lead them to change it. Marcuse also touches upon other aspects of aesthetics, like his belief in a constant standard allowing us to distinguish between high and low art and the question of the 'end of art' as posited by Bertolt Brecht and others. Nevertheless his main argument is most powerful: he ends the book by praising art's role in representing 'the ultimate goal of all revolutions: the freedom and happiness of the individual.' Truly a valuable book for all students of art, aesthetics and philosophy."
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1978
Theory and Politics: A Discussion

“Theory and Politics: A Discussion,” Telos 38 (Winter 1978-79). (excerpt) With Habermas, Tilman Spengler, and Heinz Lubasz.

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1979
The Aesthetic Dimension

Developing a concept briefly introduced in Counterrevolution and Revolt, Marcuse here addresses the shortcomings of Marxist aesthetic theory and explores a dialectical aesthetic in which art functions as the conscience of society. Marcuse argues that art is the only form or expression that can take up where religion and philosophy fail and contends that aesthetics offers the last refuge for two-dimensional criticism in a one-dimensional society.

Publisher's Page

Wikipedia page

1 review

1 other resource

Translations: español suomi français italiano Türkçe

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1979
Die Angst des Prometheus

"Die Angst des Prometheus," in tageszeitung (31 July 1979)[shortly after Herbert died]

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1979
Die Ideologie des Todes

"Die Ideologie des Todes," in: Hans Ebeling (ed.), Der Tod in der Moderne (Frankfurt, 1979), 106-115.

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1979
Ecology and the Critique of Modern Society

Herbert Marcuse, "Ecology and the Critique of Modern Society", in: Capitalism, Nature, Socialism 3:3(1992) pp. 29-37
with commentaries by Andrew Feenberg, Joel Kovel, Douglas Kellner and C. Fred Alford (37-48)

Publisher's Page

Full text (PDF)

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1979
Failure of the New Left?

"Failure of the New Left?" in: New German Critique, 18 (Fall 1979): 3-11.

(expanded version of a lecture given in April, 1975 at the University of California, Irvine. A German version appeared in Zeit-messung (Frankfurt am Main, 1975)

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1979
The Reification of the Proletariat

"The Reification of the Proletariat," Canadian Journal of Political and Social Theory, 3 (Winter 1979): 20-23.

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1979
Studentenbewegung: Und was danach?

Studentenbewegung: Und was danach? by Marcuse and others, Argument Studienhefte, no. 30 (Berlin: Argument Verlag, 1979).

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1998
Technology, War and Fascism

Herbert Marcuse's Collected Papers, Volume 1: Technology, War and Fascism
edited by Douglas Kellner and Peter Marcuse (Routledge, 1998).

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1999
Correspondence on the German Student Movement

Theodor W. Adorno and Herbert Marcuse, “Correspondence on the German Student Movement,” trans. Esther Leslie, New Left Review, no. 233 (January/February 1999): 123-136. (introduction p. 118-123).

  • Presents the correspondence between social philosophers Theodor Adorno and Herbert Marcuse focusing on student movement in Germany in the year 1969. Adorno's account of an incident when student activists occupied a university building; Marcuse's expression of disagreement with Adorno's decision and action regarding the incident. Focuses on the correspondence between social philosophers Herbert Marcuse and Theodor Adorno in the year 1969. Letters' focus on student activism in Germany; Marcuse's experience while lecturing in Italy; Adorno's legal encounter with German student activist Hans-Jurgen Krahl.
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2001
Towards a Critical Theory of Society

Herbert Marcuse's Collected Papers, Volume 2: Towards a Critical Theory of Society, with papers from the 1960s and early 1970s and an afterword by Juergen Habermas (Routledge, 2001).

This second volume of Marcuse's collected papers includes unpublished manuscripts from the late 1960s and early 1970s, such as Beyond One-Dimensional Man, Cultural Revolution and The Historical Fate of Bourgeois Democracy, as well as a rich collection of letters. It shows Marcuse at his most radical, focusing on his critical theory of contemporary society, his analyses of technology, capitalism, the fate of the individual, and prospects for social change in contemporary society.

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2004
The New Left and the 1960s

Douglas Kellner (ed), Herbert Marcuse's Collected Papers, Volume 3: The New Left and the 1960s (Routledge, 2004), 224 pages

  • $56/70 at amazon.com
  • From the publisher's website:
    "The New Left and the 1960s is the third volume of Herbert Marcuse's collected papers. In 1964, Marcuse qublished a major study of advanced industrial society, One Dimensional Man, which was an important influence on the young radicals who formed the New Left. Marcuse embodied many of the defining political impulses of the New Left in his thought and politics - hence a younger generation of political activists looked up to him for theoretical and political guidance. The new material collected in this volume provides a rich and deep grasp of the era and the role of Marcuse in the theoretical and political dramas of the day.
    This volume contains articles, letters, talks an interviews including: "On the New Left," a transcription of the 1968 talk at The Guardian newpaper's 20th anniversary; "Reflections on the French Revolution" which contains comments on the 1968 French student and worker uprising; "Liberation from the Affluent Society" which presents Marcuse's contribution to the 1967 "Dialectics of Liberations" conference; and "USA: Questions of Organization and the Revolutionary Subject", a conversation between Marcuse and the German writer Hans Magnus Enzenburger, published here in English for the first time.
    Edited by Douglas Kellner, this volume will be of interest to all those previously unfamiliar with Herbert Marcuse, generally acknowledged as a major figure in the intellectual and social mileux of the 1960s and 1970s, as well as to specialists who will here have access to previously disparate papers."
  • review: Russell Jacoby, "Men in Dark Times," Nation, Feb 7, 2005 (archive copy with responses by Kellner and P. Marcuse)
  • This is the third volume in a series of six.

Publisher's Page

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2005
Heideggerian Marxism

Herbert Marcuse, Heideggerian Marxism, edited by Richard Wolin and John Abromeit (Univ. of Nebraska Press, 2005), 288 pages.

Publisher's blurb:
Marcuse studied with Martin Heidegger at Freiburg University from 1928 to 1932 and completed a dissertation on Hegel's theory of historicity under Heidegger's supervision. During these years, Marcuse wrote a number of provocative philosophical essays experimenting with the possibilities of Heideggerian Marxism. For a time he believed that Heidegger's ideas could revitalize Marxism, providing a dimension of experiential concreteness that was sorely lacking in the German Idealist tradition. Ultimately, two events deterred Marcuse from completing this program: the 1932 publication of Marx's early economic and philosophical manuscripts, and Heidegger's conversion to Nazism a year later. Heideggerian Marxism offers rich and fascinating testimony concerning the first attempt to fuse Marxism and existentialism.

These essays offer invaluable insight concerning Marcuse's early philosophical evolution. They document one of the century's most important Marxist philosophers attempting to respond to the "crisis of Marxism": the failure of the European revolution coupled with the growing repression in the USSR. In response, Marcuse contrived an imaginative and original theoretical synthesis: "existential Marxism."

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2006
Art and Liberation

Douglas Kellner (ed) Herbert Marcuse's Collected Papers, Volume 4: Art and Liberation (Routledge, 2006), 224 pages

The role of art in Marcuse’s work has often been neglected, misinterpreted or underplayed. His critics accused him of a religion of art and aesthetics that leads to an escape from politics and society. Yet, as this volume demonstrates, Marcuse analyzes culture and art in the context of how it produces forces of domination and resistance in society, and his writings on culture and art generate the possibility of liberation and radical social transformation.

The material in this volume is a rich collection of many of Marcuse’s published and unpublished writings, interviews and talks, including ‘Lyric Poetry after Auschwitz’, reflections on Proust, and Letters on Surrealism; a poem by Samuel Beckett for Marcuse’s eightieth birthday with exchange of letters; and many articles that explore the role of art in society and how it provides possibilities for liberation.

This volume will be of interest to those new to Marcuse, generally acknowledged as a major figure in the intellectual and social milieus of the 1960s and 1970s, as well as to the specialist, giving access to a wealth of material from the Marcuse Archive in Frankfurt and his private collection in San Diego, some of it published here in English for the first time.

A comprehensive introduction by Douglas Kellner reflects on the genesis, development, and tensions within Marcuse’s aesthetic, while an afterword by Gerhard Schweppenhäuser summarizes their relevance for the contemporary era.

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2006
Proust

Herbert Marcuse, “Proust,” Telos 134 (Spring 2006)

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2007
The Essential Marcuse

An overview of Herbert Marcuse’s political and philosophical writing over four decades, with excerpts from his major books as well as essays from various academic journals.

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2010
Philosophy, Psychoanalysis and Emancipation

Herbert Marcuse's Collected Papers, Volume 5: Philosophy, Psychoanalysis and Emancipation
edited by Douglas Kellner and Clayton Pierce, Routledge [Dec. 2010]

Edited by Douglas Kellner and Clayton Pierce, Philosophy, Psychoanalysis and Emancipation is the fifth volume of Herbert Marcuse's collected papers. Containing some of Marcuse’s most important work, this book presents for the first time his unique syntheses of philosophy, psychoanalysis, and critical social theory, directed toward human emancipation and social transformation.

Within philosophy, Marcuse engaged with disparate and often conflicting philosophical perspectives - ranging from Heidegger and phenomenology, to Hegel, Marx, and Freud - to create unique philosophical insights, often overlooked in favor of his theoretical and political interventions with the New Left, the subject of previous volumes. This collection assembles significant, and in some cases unknown texts from the Herbert Marcuse archives in Frankfurt, including:

  • critiques of positivism and idealism, Dewey’s pragmatism, and the tradition of German philosophy
  • philosophical essays from the 1930s and 1940s that attempt to reconstruct philosophy on a materialist base
  • Marcuse’s unique attempts to bring together Freud and philosophy
  • philosophical reflections on death, human aggression, war, and peace
  • Marcuse’s later critical philosophical perspectives on science, technology, society, religion, and ecology.
A comprehensive introduction by Douglas Kellner, Tyson Lewis and Clayton Pierce places Marcuse’s work in the context of his engagement with the main currents of twentieth century politics and philosophy. An Afterword by Andrew Feenberg provides a personal memory of Marcuse as scholar, teacher and activist, and summarizes the lasting relevance of his radical thought

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2012
The Dunayevskaya-Marcuse-Fromm Correspondence

The Dunayevskaya-Marcuse-Fromm Correspondence, 1954-1978: Dialogues on Hegel, Marx, and Critical Theory, edited by Kevin B. Anderson, Russell Rockwell (Lanham, Md. : Lexington Books, 2012), lix, 269 pages, includes bibliographical references and index. UCSD: JC233.M299 D86 2012

  • Part one. The Dunayevskaya-Marcuse correspondence, 1954-78: the early letters: debating Marxist dialectics and Hegel's absolute idea; Dunayevskaya's Marxism and freedom and beyond; on technology and work on the eve of Marcuse' s One-dimensional man; the later correspondence: winding down during the period of the New Left
    Part two. The Dunayevskaya-Fromm correspondence, 1959-78: the early letters: on Fromm's Marx's concept of man and his socialist humanism symposium; dialogue on Marcuse, on existentialism, and on socialist humanism in Eastern Europe; on Hegel, Marxism, and the Frankfurt School in the period of Dunayevskaya's philosophy and revolution; the final letters: on critical theory and on Rosa Luxemburg, gender, and revolution

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2014
Baran's critique of modern society and of the social sciences

"Baran's critique of modern society and of the social sciences," in: Monthly Review 65:10 (Mar. 2014), 20-29. [UCepub 2015]

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2014
Marxism, Revolution and Utopia

Herbert Marcuse's Collected Papers, Volume 6: Marxism, Revolution and Utopia
edited by Douglas Kellner and Clayton Pierce, Routledge [Dec. 2014]

This sixth and final volume of Marcuse's collected papers shows Marcuse’s rejection of the prevailing twentieth-century Marxist theory and socialist practice - which he saw as inadequate for a thorough critique of Western and Soviet bureaucracy - and the development of his revolutionary thought towards a critique of the consumer society. Marcuse's later philosophical perspectives on technology, ecology, and human emancipation sat at odds with many of the classic tenets of Marx’s materialist dialectic which placed the working class as the central agent of change in capitalist societies. As the material from this volume shows, Marcuse was not only a theorist of Marxist thought and practice in the twentieth century, but also proves to be an essential thinker for understanding the neoliberal phase of capitalism and resistance in the twenty-first century.

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2015
Paris Lectures at Vincennes University

Charles Reitz and Peter-Erwin Jansen (eds.) Paris Lectures at Vincennes University, 1974: Global Capitalism and Radical Opposition (CreateSpace, 2015), 142 pages.

Blurb:
"This volume advances Marcuse scholarship by presenting seven newly discovered, hitherto unpublished, lectures to students at Vincennes University, a branch of the Sorbonne. Marcuse's critical analysis focuses on core features of American society, its political economy, its culture, and the potential attainability of a free socialist future. These 1974 manuscripts were found in 2014 in the Marcuse archive at the University of Frankfurt by Peter-Erwin Jansen. Jansen and Charles Reitz edited and annotated the lectures for publication. Commentary by Sarah Surak, Detlev Claussen, and Douglas Kellner illuminates the historical context of Marcuse's theoretical perspective and his relevance to contemporary movements for social change."

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2017
Transvaluation of Values and Radical Social Change

Charles Reitz, Peter-Erwin Jansen and Sarah Surak (eds.), Herbert Marcuse, Transvaluation of Values and Radical Social Change: Five New Lectures, 1966-1976 (Createspace, 2017), 174 pages

  • Terry Maley, "Introduction: Five New Lectures--in Context"
  • "The Rationality of Philosophy," San Diego, 1966
  • "Protest and Futility," Berkeley, 1967
  • "Art and the Transvaluation of Values," Toronto, 1976
  • "The University and Raidical Social Change," Kent State, 1976
  • "The Radical Transformation of Norms, Needs and Values," Saint Louis, 1977
  • Charles Reitz, "Recalling Herbert Marcuse"
  • Peter-Erwin Jansen, "The Desire for Community"
  • Andrew Feenberg, "Afterword: Marcuse's Dialectic"
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